Redeemer Ev. Lutheran Church, Iola, WI

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Heresies in The Shack, Part 5 – Conclusion

The Shack proclaims a particularly insidious form of false doctrine, because in many respects it comes so near to true doctrine.  But the Devil can also quote Scripture (cf. Matt. 4:1-11).  The values of love and forgiveness among neighbors are worthy, but when this is put into the mouth of God, it must be either Scripturally sound or rejected.  “If anyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to the one you received, let him be accursed” (Gal. 1:9).  I will not presume to judge the faith of the moviemakers or of William P. Young (who claims to be a Christian), but I will judge what they preach.  It is a gospel contrary to the one we have received.  It does not preach a Jesus who died to take our sins upon himself.  It does not preach that Jesus is the only way to life (John 14:6).  It gives strength to man himself to produce the faith that saves, to do the works of kindness and forgiveness.  The Shack is about our feelings, not about God.

That defense was given of the movie: “It’s only dangerous if you don’t know the Bible, because then you’ll think it’s real.”  If you know the Bible, however, you ought to know all those warnings given by Jesus, Peter, and Paul, such as: “I appeal to you, brothers, to watch out for those who cause divisions and create obstacles contrary to the doctrine that you have been taught; avoid them” (Rom. 16:17).  While for some this movie may be feel-good, beware, for that is exactly what it seeks to do: by making you feel good, it preaches a doctrine of a God who wants only to make you feel good.  This movie is best avoided, as Paul said; and as Jesus said, “Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves” (Matt. 7:15).  Don’t be deceived by the fuzzy sheep’s wool that covers this film.  It is a wolf: “be watchful.  Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.  Resist him, firm in your faith” (1 Pet. 5:8-9).

Do not welcome this film into your life, into your home, into your heart.  That is all reserved by God for the truth.  He proclaims forgiveness, life, and salvation on account of Christ Jesus who took our place under his wrath, because God is both just (he must punish evil) and merciful (he is rich in steadfast love, forgiving us in Jesus’ name).  The God of The Shack is a sham, an idol, and a wimp.  The God of Scripture is almighty and merciful, who promises, “Whoever believes in [Jesus] is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God” (John 3:18).  Believe in Jesus, as he is revealed in God’s true Word, not in this heretical trap.

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Heresies in The Shack, Part 2 – The Source of Religious Knowledge (and the Nature of God)

A great deal of the movie’s themes are wrapped up in the idea that man cannot know the mind of God.  This is truly Scriptural, as St. Paul writes, “For who knows a person’s thoughts except the spirit of that person, which is in him? So also no one comprehends the thoughts of God except the Spirit of God” (1 Cor. 2:11).  So in the film, Papa (the nickname for God) declares, “You have no idea how much I’m doing right now,” while appearing to the main character, Mack, to be sunbathing.  Likewise, the personification of Wisdom convinces Mack of this moral: God’s job is very, very difficult, so don’t act like you can do what he does.

In the midst of all this unknowability of God’s mind and thoughts, Papa directs Mack (and the audience) to a faith-understanding, or trust, based on feelings.  When Mack asks questions, frequently he is directed to look inside himself and investigate how he feels about it.  Never is Mack directed to the Word of God to understand God’s will.  Instead, the Word is often dismissed and belittled.  For example, when Papa appears to Mack as a large, comforting woman, he asks her name.  Her response is, “I am known by many names.  One of my favorites is Elousia.”  Then, when “I AM” is brought up, Papa jokingly says, “I AM that I AM,” dismissing the Scripturally revealed name of God. The name God reveals of himself in Scripture is therefore dismissed in favor of a man-made name that Papa presumably cherishes because one of his children invented it for him (depicting God as a glorified loving parent who frames up the terrible mac-and-cheese art made by his children, not because it’s good, but because he loves them).

On another occasion, Mack interrogates Papa on why he abandoned his Son Jesus on the cross.  Mack even quotes Jesus’ words, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matt. 27:46).  Papa brushes this quotation off and says, “You don’t understand the mystery.”  She then shows Mack the nail scars that she has on her hands, seeking to prove that she (God the Father) was with Jesus in his death. (More on this specific event later.)

If this isn’t enough evidence to demonstrate that The Shack directs the audience away from Scripture for God’s revelation, Mack receives his communication from God via an unmarked envelope in his mailbox, not from God’s Word.  St. Paul wrote to St. Timothy: “[C]ontinue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through Christ Jesus.  All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work” (2 Tim. 3:14-17).  The Shack at least implies that something else is needed to supplement Scripture – and if you’d like to put a name to what that other thing is, it’s “Subjective Feelings.”

Feasting with God #40 – A Glutton, a Drunkard, a Friend of Sinners

Feasting with God #40

A Glutton, a Drunkard, a Friend of Sinners

Text: Matthew 11:18-19

18For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.’  19The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Look at him!  A glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’  Yet wisdom is justified by her deeds.

The childishness of the Pharisees is revealed: When John the Baptist came, they found fault in his fasting, how he set himself apart from the general populace.  When Jesus came, the found fault in his eating and drinking, how he deliberately did not set himself apart from the general populace.  They would simply not be pleased.

This is not only a fault in the Pharisees of 2,000 years ago.  It is human nature to have certain expectations, and to demand that things measure up to those expectations.  When nothing ever measures up, we are dissatisfied and disappointed over and over, finding satisfaction only in ourselves: “If you want something done right, do it yourself,” is our mentality.  For the Pharisees, this meant that the Messiah who had come, Jesus, who proved himself to be that Messiah by his deeds, was not what they wanted.  So they planned to continue in the working of their laws, laying burden after burden on themselves and other people, trying to climb their own way to heaven.

For us, this means very little different.  We are dissatisfied with the Gospel for any number of reasons: “That’s too easy; it has to be harder.”  “That’s too old; it has to be more relevant to me today.”  “That’s too culturally locked in Israel from 2,000 years ago; it has nothing to do with the broader cultural context.”  “That’s too limited in its perspective; it has to apply to more people.”  “That’s too remote; there’s no real emotion behind it.”

Human beings, you and I, we want what we want.  If it’s not exactly what we want, then there’s something wrong with it.  It’s this that causes us to go church-shopping even when we’ve been consistently fed the Gospel.  It’s this that causes us to grow sick of hymns that are uninteresting to us or liturgies that are old and dusty, even when these things feed us the pure and unadulterated Word of God.  We’d rather worship in our own way, worship a God who “means something to us” than the one who reveals himself in his Word.

This is why Jesus points out this hypocrisy and childishness.  Notice, he doesn’t actually call out the Pharisees here.  He mentions “this generation,” (11:16).  The generation, the people concurrent with Christ, were guilty of this childish dissatisfaction, and their issue has continued through the ages to us today.  All people are guilty of seeking out what they want rather than what’s true.

And this is why Jesus concludes: “Yet wisdom is justified by her deeds.”  The wise people will prove themselves to be wise by their actions: by forsaking their selfish wants and following the objective Word of God.  But more than this, Jesus’ wisdom is demonstrated by his deeds: “the blind receive their sight and the lame walk, lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, and the poor have good news preached to them” (11:5).  These actions prove Jesus to be the Wisdom of God incarnate (cf. Prov. 8, 9), the Word of God incarnate (John 1:1), the Messiah who was to come.  If the people are wise, they will judge these deeds as they are objectively meant to be judged, and they will indisputably here see Christ the Messiah.

But the people of the world are not wise in this way.  We are all blind, foolish, childish, and cannot see this.  We can’t see it until the Holy Spirit enlightens us: “you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, ‘Abba!  Father!’” (Rom. 8:15).  The enlightening of faith given by the Spirit leads us to see Christ as he is: our Savior from sin who fulfilled the whole law by his deeds, and who paid the price for our disobedience by his obedient death on the cross.  And one further deed of this Jesus is a convincing proof to us of the wisdom of trusting in him: he rose from the dead, and lives now eternally, to intercede for us as our High Priest, declaring all our sins forgiven continually before God in heaven.

Dear Christ, we thank you for your obedient life and death, by which we are declared forgiven and justified.  We thank you also for sending the Holy Spirit to give us faith in your sacrifice, for on our own we would be blind and concerned only with our own accomplishments.  Maintain us in this wise faith until our last day, when we will come into our inheritance in full in our heavenly home.  In your name we ask it.  Amen.

Scripture quotations are from the Holy Bible, English Standard Version®, copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.  Used by permission.  All rights reserved.