Redeemer Ev. Lutheran Church, Iola, WI

Sermons, Devotions, and News from Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran Church in Iola, WI

Tag Archives: hunger

Feasting with God #27 – A Banquet in Paradise

Feasting with God #27

A Banquet in Paradise

Text: Genesis 2:15-17

15The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to work it and keep it.  16And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden, 17but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”

Can you picture what life was like in the garden of Eden?  It’s difficult to do so, because we have to put it into terms we understand.  Adam and Eve “worked” the garden.  When we think of work, we think of hours clocking in and out, toiling and laboring to make a buck.  Perhaps we enjoy our jobs, but there are still bad days when we come home exhausted and sore and dread having to go back the next morning.  Many people enjoy gardening, working the ground, getting dirt under their fingernails, being in nature.  But even so, mosquitoes bite, the hard ground makes our knees sore, the sun burns our skin.  The garden work in Eden was without any of this exhaustion or soreness.  That’s hard to picture.

A life without hunger and thirst is hard to picture as well.  Adam and Eve surely never felt hunger pains before the Fall, never were so parched that their lips cracked.  Why would they have the need to eat, then?

God gave our first parents the run of the garden, telling them, “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden.”  The world was new!  Adam was experiencing this paradise with the eyes of a newborn.  Imagine how those colors must have struck him, how beautiful!  Think of his other senses: all the sounds of the birds and beasts, of the rivers that came through the garden, the wind blowing through the trees!  All the sensations against his hands, of cool water, warm sunlight, soft animal fur and flower petals, smooth stone!  All the smells, of mud, of flowers and fruits!  He of course would be curious to experience God’s world with all his senses, including the sense of taste.

Imagine tasting an apple for the first time, an orange, a pomegranate, a strawberry.  Adam could explore this home, tasting every part of the banquet God provided for him.  His life would be filled with discovery and rediscovery, never growing tired of the task, never struggling to satisfy a hunger he never felt, never growing uncomfortable because of the food he ate.

God never meant for us to feel hunger-pains.  But the boundary he set—“of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat”—was broken by Adam and Eve.  Therefore the result of their trespass broke in—“in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”  Death has entered God’s perfect world, because of sin.  Therefore all God’s creation is corrupt.  The creatures who once lived in peace now hunt and kill one another.  The water that bubbled softly through the rivers to irrigate the garden now floods and drowns.  The food that was once a source only of enjoyment and discovery and fellowship now becomes a necessity for staving off death, sometimes causes stomachache, and is never quite enough, for all men die.

By corrupting the gift God gave man of food and eating, mankind has corrupted all of God’s gifts.  But thanks be to God that he did not abandon us to our fate; instead he immediately began working restoration.  In his Son, Jesus, he took all the corruption of the world onto himself and paid the price for our trespass, “redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us” (Gal. 3:13).  To provide for us the blessings of that payment, among other things (the Word, Baptism), Jesus instituted the Lord’s Supper, a fellowship meal of his true body and blood that feeds our souls for eternity.  With it also comes the promise of a new paradise in heaven, which is frequently referred to as a great banquet (Luke 14:7-24).

Dear Lord, we have corrupted all the gifts you have given us, and we have brought death and sin into your perfect world.  But despite our wrongdoing, you have provided a way for us to receive new blessings once again, in the work of your Son, Jesus Christ.  Lead us to an ever firmer faith in that Son, and feed us always on the great blessings of your Word and Sacraments, until we may come into the new banquet in paradise with you for all eternity.  In the name of that Jesus we pray.  Amen.

Scripture quotations are from the Holy Bible, English Standard Version®, copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.  Used by permission.  All rights reserved.

Feasting with God #23 – Overcome Evil with Good

Feasting with God #23

Overcome Evil with Good

Romans 12:14-21

14Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. 15Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. 16Live in harmony with one another. Do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly. Never be wise in your own sight. 17Repay no one evil for evil, but give thought to do what is honorable in the sight of all. 18If possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all. 19Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave it to the wrath of God, for it is written, “Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.” 20To the contrary, “if your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink; for by so doing you will heap burning coals on his head.” 21Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

If we are Christians, then we ought to live as Christians. Because we are unable to escape our sinfulness while we live on this earth, it’s not always an easy task to live in a Christian way, and Paul gives us some advice in this passage to help us live like Christians.

When someone persecutes us, it’s easy—it’s human nature—to curse them, to wish evil upon them, or to defame them to others. It’s especially easy for Christians, because we know we’re not supposed to react violently. So we’ll react with our words. But Paul says, “Bless those who persecute you.” He lays a great deal of responsibility at our feet, in fact: “Live in harmony with one another…. If possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all.” In his Sermon on the Mount Jesus calls Christians “peacemakers” (Matt. 5:9). Paul expects us here to be able to keep the peace. “He started it!” we might say. And we might be right. But the advice of my parents comes back to me whenever I think that: “It takes two to fight.”

So, for our responsibility, we won’t fight. Let our enemies persecute us all they like, we won’t fight back. That’s what Paul asks us to do. It’s not easy. And even harder is what he further asks us to do: “To the contrary, ‘if your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink.’” Not only are we to not fight, but we are to react with kindness, even feeding our enemy. I can think of very few things I would find less pleasant than hosting someone who was my enemy, someone I despised, someone who hated me. I would hate to have to feed them dinner, give them room and board even for a night. But this, Paul says, is what we are to do: “for by so doing you will heap burning coals on his head.”

Of course, there are times when Christians cannot sit idly by while injustices are done. Especially we can see this in the example of Christ, when he drove out the money-changers from the temple, even using a whip and overturning their tables, accusing them, “It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer,’ but you make it a den of robbers” (Matt. 21:13). This is a righteous anger, and in the right context, it is the appropriate response.

It may not always be clear to Christians when we should respond with love, “feeding our enemies,” and when we should respond with anger, in wrath and vengeance. Luther writes, “To understand this, you must distinguish between God and man, between persons and issues. Where God an issues are involved, there is neither patience nor blessing but only zeal, wrath, vengeance, and cursing” (LW 14:258). This is the appropriate distinction. When God’s holy things are being defamed and destroyed, the Christian in faith responds with zeal. But when one’s own person is persecuted and broken, then we react in love, trusting God’s promise, when he says, “Vengeance is mine, I will repay.”

“Do not be haughty,” Paul says; and, “Never be wise in your own sight.” If we go about thinking that we can do no wrong, thinking that we are wise and holier than others, then it is natural that we would react with righteous anger rather than love. But we are not to consider ourselves this way. Rather we should humble ourselves. If we are persecuted or wronged, we can forgive, as Jesus did on the cross when the sins were against his own body. We overcome evil with good.

But it’s not easy. We are still sinful on this earth, and we want to take revenge, we want to respond in wrath. But thankfully we can turn to Jesus who accomplished this very thing. By living this way perfectly, forgiving and blessing his enemies, and then by dying as though he were a murderer, Jesus took our place, paid for our sins, including the ones of vengeance and hatred. And now, in faith, the Holy Spirit dwells in our hearts and enables us to react with blessing and love, feeding our enemies when they are hungry, and giving them drink when they are thirsty. We don’t have to have the strength of character to accomplish it. It’s accomplished by God already. We only need faith.

Dear Lord, thank you for paying the price for all our sins, even though we ourselves were your enemies. Help us to forgive and bless our enemies, even as you forgave and blessed us. Lead us to do these works of service to you, strengthening us in doing good, so that we may overcome evil. In Jesus’ name we pray. Amen.

Scripture quotations are from the Holy Bible, English Standard Version®, copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Feasting with God #21 – I Am the Bread of Life

Feasting with God #21

I Am the Bread of Life

Text: John 6:35-40

35Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst.  36But I said to you that you have seen me and yet do not believe.  37All that the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never cast out.  38For I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will but the will of him who sent me.  39And this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me, but raise it up on the last day.  40For this is the will of my Father, that everyone who looks on the Son and believes in him should have eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day.”

We have seen Jesus rise.  No, our physical eyes weren’t there 2,000 years ago, but with our eyes of faith we look on the Son who was killed for our trespasses and who was raised again for our justification, and in that belief, we have eternal life.

It’s sometimes hard to think about all the people in the world who are starving.  We think of the third-world countries in Africa, parts of Asia and the Middle East, some even here in the United States.  We picture so easily the sad children of those places, who never know where their next meal will come from, or even if they’ll have a next meal.  Our hearts can’t help but go out to them, and often we wish there was more we could do.

As Christians, we ought to do what we can to help those in need.  Sometimes that does mean donating money to charity, or even providing literal bread to someone in need.  Truly noble acts, but how much do we think about the long run?  A loaf of bread may feed several children for a week, but they need more than that.  They need the means to have food for the rest of their lives.  But they need even more than that.  They need access to food that will keep them from ever going hungry.

In the text today, Jesus provides the access to that very food.  “Whoever comes to me shall not hunger,” he says.  He’s not speaking about a loaf of baked bread.  He’s speaking about eternal, spiritual food.  Any earthly bread will keep our earthly bodies alive, but what about our souls?  Our spiritual bodies will need nourishing as well, and this we get by faith in Christ.  This Jesus states clearly: “Everyone who looks on the Son and believes in him should have eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day.”  By faith we take part in the nourishing bread that is Christ.  By believing in him, we have access to the true feast of God, that nourishment that will give us life eternal.  Because of that holy bread, we will never die—not really.

Jesus came from heaven with that mission, to share eternal life with us.  That way, whoever dies in faith can be described as only sleeping, because on the last day their bodies will wake up to new life, to full life, to eternal life.  Jesus’ resurrection on Easter gives us a picture of what that will be like for the rest of us.  Our bodies are frail and breakable and living only in shadow now.  But when we are glorified in him, our bodies will be pure, whole, and really living.

So we look to Jesus to have that pure food, to have that eternal life.  And this is a food that is easy to share with others.  We direct their eyes to the same Jesus.  We tell them his Word.  We declare that it is free, that we don’t need to do anything to get this heavenly bread, but it is given to us by God’s grace.  God loves a cheerful giver.  We can give earthly bread, earthly money to support those in need—and those things are important.  But don’t forget the most important thing: the bread that feeds our souls for eternal life, Jesus Christ.

Direct our eyes of faith, O heavenly Father, to your Son, and the great gift you have given us through him.  We often feel so harshly the temporary nature of this earthly life.  Yet as you give us our daily bread to nourish this life, do not leave us without the bread we need for eternal life.  Strengthen our faith which looks constantly to Jesus Christ as our Savior, and through him, grant us forgiveness, life, and salvation, all that we need to never go hungry.  Amen.

Scripture quotations are from the Holy Bible, English Standard Version®, copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.  Used by permission.  All rights reserved.